STREAMING,TV THE GILDED AGE S01E08 (STORY ANALYSIS)

THE GILDED AGE S01E08 (STORY ANALYSIS)

The Gilded Age S01E08 Story Analysis

The Gilded Age S01E08 is the eighth episode of a historical drama television series created by Julian Fellowes for HBO that is set in the United States during the Gilded Age, the boom years of 1880s New York City. Fellowes is, of course, best known for creating critically acclaimed and popular period dramas like the Gosford Park film and Downtown Abbey TV series.

S P O I L E R S

Entitled “Tucked Up in Newport”, The Gilded Age S01E08 is definitely the best episode of this series thus far. Considering that it is also the season’s penultimate episode, it’s a bit ironic that it’s taken this long for the series to finally hit its stride. But it’s fair to say that every sub-plot unfolded engagingly and perhaps this is why we were then able to fully appreciate the amount of detail put into the evocation of the period. Kudos to the art director and the set designers for bringing 1880s New York City alive in such a vivid manner.

READ OUR REVIEWS OF THE GILDED AGE.

But certainly, the sub-plots have begun to reach some kind of resolution especially with respect to the 1st season (yes there will be a season 2, naturally). To wit,

— Marion decides to take up Raikes’ proposal of marriage and elopement;
— Peggy reveals her secret to the Van Rhijns and is forced to leave;
— George’s legal troubles are solved due to a highly fortituious event; and
— Bertha pays the place for her unbridled ambition and is put in her place ignominiously.

Certainly, in terms of characterisation, we get to witness the charity of Agnes – she may be a snob but she’s no racist it seems, the wrath of George, Ada proves once more to be a level headed woman and Bertha is at wit’s end as to her social dilemma.

All told, The Gilded Age S01E08 was an excellent instalment of this promising period drama and if the season finale can stick its landing, we can certainly look forward to an improved season 2.

Now streaming on HBO Max.

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