NEMO: HEART OF ICE [REVIEW]

Fans of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen will be excited to find out that creators Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill have delivered a spin-off story not long after the end of the Century trilogy. Published jointly by Top Shelf Productions and Knockabout Comics, this is how the publishers have summarized the plot for your easy consumption —

It’s 1925, fifteen long years since Janni Dakkar first tried to escape the legacy of her dying science-pirate father, only to accept her destiny as the new Nemo, captain of the legendary Nautilus. Now, tired of her unending spree of plunder and destruction, Janni launches a grand expedition to surpass her father’s greatest failure: the exploration of Antarctica. Hot on her frozen trail are a trio of genius inventors, hired by an influential publishing tycoon to retrieve the plundered valuables of an African queen. It’s a deadly race to the bottom of the world — an uncharted land of wonder and horror where time is broken and the mountains bring madness. Jules Verne meets H.P. Lovecraft in the unforgettable final showdown, lost in the living, beating and appallingly inhuman HEART OF ICE.

As usual, Moore strings together characters from various fictional universes (in the public domain, of course) to weave his own distintive story. This time around, we find ourselves in the pulp fiction world of the 1920s, when science-adventurers captured the imagination of its reader. Moore uses his 56-page allotment economically, setting up the conflict quickly and resolving the same with a deft touch. It’s basically one big chase scene across the frozen wastes of the South Pole before both pursued and pursuers get their minds blown by the horrors torn from the pages of Lovecraft’s In The Mountains of Madness.

These frightful conjurings are brought to life by O’Neil’s wide-eyed angular illustrations. The grizzled features of Janni’s henchmen contrasted greatly with the relative youth of the young Captain. And once the crew slips into Lovecraftian territory, O’Neil is adept at delivering horrific representations of these classic monsters as well.

Good pulp-ish fun all round in the grand LOEG tradition. Not to be missed!

Top Shelf | Knockabout

 

 

CLASH OF THE TITANS

Why remake Clash of the Titans? Why Sam Worthington? Why oh why oh why?

As a young boy, I was always intrigued by the Greek myths and read any books about the subject I could get my hands on. So when the original Clash of the Titans was released in 1981, based on the story of Perseus, I was excited! Also as the special effects were produced by the master himself i.e. Ray Harryhausen (Sinbad movies, Jason & the Argonauts), I was assured that it would be a visual treat as well. As it turns out, the movie was an uneven mix of mythology and loads of sub-par Star Wars hokum, with cute robotic owl in tow. BUT it had great effects, as expected.

Continue reading “CLASH OF THE TITANS”