LIVE REVIEW: OF MONSTERS & MEN – LIVE IN SINGAPORE

Photo by Jazreel-Anne.
Photo by Jazreel-Anne.

Icelandic hipster band returned to Singapore for a full concert, having previously appeared at Laneway 2013. Considering the type of young fans OMAM attracts, the audience were mostly surprisingly laid back, dress-wise, with many fans donning OMAM t-shirts.

The show was sold out – no shocks there. Crowded venue, but everyone was ‘stuck’ at the back as the venue had 3 different sections, separated by barricades, which was bit weird. Most people were unaware that they are able to move to the front.

Photo by Jazreel-Anne.
Photo by Jazreel-Anne.

For the opening act – DEON, I was pleasantly surprised that the audience were quite responsive and receptive of a local act. The crowd was seen cheering and swaying along to DEON’s music. DEON ended his set with songs, ” Lights ” and “Stars” 

For OMAM, the audience was very responsive. Singing every ‘Hey’ found in their songs. However majority was bit lifeless, not willing to let loose and just enjoy the music – a typical Singaporean audience, then!

The high points of the set was a danceable “Mountain Sound”, a heart-tugging “Wolves Without Teeth”, the crowd-pleasing “Little Talks and Crystals”, which had the most number of phones and electronic gadgets up in the air. “Backyard” – a bonus track from the deluxe Beneath The Skin album – was a mystifying choice as majority of the crowd didn’t know the words. Most didn’t even attempt to sway to the song.

Photo by Jazreel-Anne.
Photo by Jazreel-Anne.

Vocalist Nanna, interacted a lot with the crowd and she appeared to be more confident compared to the last time OMAM played Singapore. Sadly, the audience, though generally receptive, were very static and very much focused on shooting videos and taking photos for every song. Not much dancing at this concert even though OMAM’s tunes are known to be very danceable.

OMAM ended their set with the song ‘Yellow Light’ , off the first album – My Head Is An Animal. An intriguing selection as the track is a slowburn fadeout rather than a lung-bursting anthem, a melancholy note perhaps.

(Jazreel-Anne)

Thanks to Symmetry Entertainment for making this review possible.