The OA poses more questions than it answers. But isn’t that a reflection of life?

The lovely and gifted Brit Marling is Prairie Johnson, a woman who resurfaces after having been missing for seven years. Blind when she disappeared, she now has her eyesight restored.

Connecting with four distinct individuals (viz. Steve Winchell (Patrick Gibson),  Alfonso Sosa/French (Brandon Perea), Elizabeth “Betty” Broderick-Allen (Phyllis Smith), Buck Vu (Ian Alexander) and Jesse (Brandon Meyer), she retells the story of her life, a tale that involves near-death experiences, the afterlife, kidnap, human experiments, inter-dimensional travel and angels!

It’s an emotional roller-coaster as we are never quite sure if Prairie’s story is legitimate or a product of her trauma experience. But the story is enthralling nonetheless and Prairie has a dramatic impact on the lives of Steve, French, Buck, Jesse & Betty.

Some reviews have compared The OA to Stranger Things and Black Mirror but those reference points are lazy and flawed. If one had to find similar TV series, it would be closer to The Leftovers and Sense8, where the strangeness is more spiritual in nature than science fiction-related.

The ending is quite vague but it’s open nature suggests that maybe we might see a second season for The OA. Which would be fine with us. Perfect binge-watching for the holiday season!

… still there’s more …